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GRE Vocabulary-Learning root words

GRE vocabulary

Preparing for the verbal part of standardized tests such as GRE, GMAT, and SAT starts with deciphering intricated words. Most of the students begin memorizing words randomly from different sources and, in the end, lacks proper understanding of the word. Learning a dozen of words is an arduous task. However, learning root words, prefixes and suffixes will help you have an educated guess on the actual exam. Even when you see a word for the first time in life, you can understand the meaning by using some combinations of the root words, prefixes and suffixes.

GRE vocabulary

When it comes to learning English, mastery of vocabulary and proper use of words is critical. A rich vocabulary can help you express yourself in many ways, from speaking more fluidly to writing better sentences that avoid common grammatical errors. Moreover, it is also worth noting how much easier reading becomes when one uses the right word choice at every turn; this grants access for understanding text and feeling engaged as one goes through each passage.

Non-native English speakers often lack a good vocabulary and barely know the common English words. To prepare for an exam, these students are at a disadvantage because they don’t have enough exposure outside of school to help them with unfamiliar phrases or sentence structures found on tests. A student’s only source is what he learns from books during class time – there isn’t much interaction between him and other media such as literature or art; this makes it difficult when taking exams.

Learning new words and gaining a good vocabulary will give you an advantage when taking the GRE, GMAT and SAT. Some people tout learning new words for GRE vocabulary as key to conquering the verbal part, but the benefits of good vocabulary are not confined to taking a test. You will find yourself using more than just the few hundred words you see on your vocab page, and being able to use them in any situation will make dealing with people easier.

What are the root words?

Root words are basic and small words, used with prefixes and suffixes to make more complex words. For example, “dict-” is a root word meaning “Say or speak”. Combining it with prefixes and suffixes can generate more words such as: dictate, contradict, predict, verdict, retrodiction, etc.

 

By learning root words, one can use root words, prefixes and suffixes to unlock the meanings of complex words. These words will eventually help you understand the byzantine sentences used in text completion, critical reasoning, sentence correction and reading comprehension. For non-native English speakers, it is taxing to memorize new words, and most do so only while preparing for a standardized test; GRE, GMAT and SAT. Memorizing root words will help most people and let them decipher the meaning of a word by using a part or parts of root words. 

 

So the bottom line on root words is that they underscore how you prepare for a test. It is wise to learn new words in conjunction with root words. Moreover, learning few root words will help you work with some significant roots, prefixes, and suffixes. 

Most important 45 root words

Although there is a deluge of root words, having a proper understanding of 45 root words can work best for a GRE, GMAT, and SAT Aspirant. Tricky tests prep considers the below-mentioned root words most important based on words used in official material. 

List of 45 root words, prefixes and suffixes for GRE Vocabulary.

Root, Prefix, or suffix

Meaning

Examples

a-

Without

Anomaly, amoral, amorphous, asexual

anti-

Against, opposed to

Antibiotic, antipathy, antisocial, antiwar

ante-

Behind, before

Antediluvian, antecedent, antedate

ambi-

On both sides

Ambisexual, ambidextrous, ambivalent

aqu/aqua-

Water

Aquamarine, aquatic, aquarium, aqueduct

bene-

Good, boon

Beneficial, benediction, benevolent

bi-

Two

Bifurcated, bitonal, biannual, bisect

bio-

Life

Biology, biome, biopic

cede/ceed

Yield, go

Antecede, precede, exceed, recede

circum-

Around

Circumference, circumscribe, circumvent

contra-

Opposite, against

Contradictory, contraception, controversy

cycl

Circle

Recycle, cyclical, cycle

de-

Remove, reduce

Depreciate, deescalate, defenestrate, decelerate

di-, dis-

Put apart, away

Disagree, digress, disappear

dict

Say, speak

Dictation, dictator, predict, contradict

dox

Belief

Orthodox, paradox, heterodox

du-, duo-

Two

Dual, duology, duochrome

em-, en-

Into, in

Embrace, enclose, encircle

esce

Becoming

Coalesce, adolescence, obsolescent, tumescent

ex-

Out, way

Exit, exhale, extirpate, exile

extra-, extro-

Beyond or outside

Extraordinary, extraterrestrial

fid/e

Faith

Bonafide, fidelity, confide

fore

Before, previously, earlier

Forestall, before, forebear, forebode, forecast

gram

Writing, letters

Diagram, grammar, epigram, telegram

graph

Writing, recording

Paragraph, autograph, graphics

hetero-

Different

Heterosexual, heterozygous, heterogeneous, heterodox

homo-

Same

Homogenous, homosexual, homologous

hyper-

Excessive

Hyperactive, hyperbole

hypo-

Under, below

Hypothermia, hypocrite, hypoglycemic

inter-

Between

Intercede, interlude

intra-/intro-

Inside, within

Introvert, intramural, intravenous

junct

Joining

Juncture, conjunction, disjunct

-less

Without

Listless, aimless, heartless

-logy

The study of

Biology, geology, psychology

mal, male

Bad, evil

Malediction, malice

mis-

Bad or incorrect

Misprint, misbehave, misstep

-ness

State of being

Likeness, greatness

non-

Not, without

Nonfiction, nonresident

ob-

Against or before

Obdurate, obfuscate

omni-

All, everything

Omnipotent, omniscient, omnivorous

pedi, pede

Foot

Pedestrian, pedicure

phil

Love or affinity

Libliophile, philanthropy

pre-

Before or earlier

Pretest, preamble

pro-

Before or forward

Proceed, prologue

re-

Again, backwards

Reaction, rebound, reuse

sub-

Under or lower

Submarine, subprime

temp

Time

Temporal, contemporary, temporarily

tort

Twist

Tortuous, contortion

trans-

Across or beyond

Transnational, transit

un-

Not or opposite

Unimpressive, unwanted, unwarranted

What is the best source of learning new words?

Learning root words are the key to unlocking a word’s true meaning, but you also have an opportunity for more learning by exploring different meanings and uses in books or articles. Although, this way may take longer than actively practicing new vocabulary on your own–but it will be worth every second.

The benefits of reading extensively include not only discovering what certain words mean but also how they’re used within sentences throughout various media sources such as newspapers, magazines, books and articles. By looking at these additional resources we can pick up knowledge nuggets that go beyond just one source; adding another dimension into our linguistic research while broadening perspective. Vocabulary.com is a good website to learn the in-context meaning of a word for GRE vocabulary.